Female Politician Introduces Act To Fine Men Caught Masturbating

Texas State Rep. Jessica Farrar has introduced a bill which would see men in Texas fined $100 for “unregulated masturbatory emissions”.

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The men would also have to undergo a medically unnecessary digital rectal exam along with a Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Rectum before getting a vasectomy, a colonoscopy or a prescription for Viagra. The proposed bill will penalize masturbatory emissions outside of a vagina or medical facility as “an act against an unborn child”, failing to preserve ”the sanctity of life”.

Fines collected under the bill would be channelled through the Department of Family and Protective services for the care of children. Jessica Farrar created the “Men’s Right To Know Act” to highlight the unfair targeting of woman by regulations in reproductive health care. The bill is satirical version of a Texas law passed in 2011 requiring woman to have a sonogram along with a detailed description of the foetus before an abortion. These rules are in a booklet produced by the state of Texas titled “A Woman’s Right to Know”.

In a statement to the Houston Chronicle Jessica Farrar said “A lot of people find the bill funny”. “What’s not funny are the obstacles that Texas women face every day, that were placed there by legislatures making it very difficult for them to access health care.” The measures would also prevent lawsuits against physicians refusing to perform vasectomies, colonoscopies and prescribing Viagra due to their “personal, moralistic or religious belief.”

The proposal includes that the state keep a registry of private hospitals and organisations that council men to remain fully abstinent, offering physicians to supervise masturbation and ensure semen is stored for future conception. Anti-abortion legislation has been enacted by the Texas Capitol for years, but last year the conservatives were dealt a blow when the Supreme Court ruled that two provisions in a 2013 law were unconstitutional.

The first would have required abortion clinics to have admitting privileges at hospitals, the other would have made clinics adhere to standards of ambulatory surgical centres. The Texas Capitol has been churning out anti-abortion legislation for years. But the state’s conservatives were dealt a blow last year when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that two provisions of a 2013 Texas law were unconstitutional.

One would have required abortion clinics to have admitting privileges at hospitals, and another would have made clinics adhere to standards of ambulatory surgical centres.